Social Media and Freemasonry, The light at the end of the tunnel

52-Image-SocialMedia

To a cynical sort, the future of Freemasonry might be in jeopardy, what with the 21st century and the ‘internet’ generation now obtaining any or every bit of information on seemingly everything they want at the click of a mouse or a google search.

we find ourselves asking do the traditional secrets and values of freemasonry hold up against this ever changing world of fast demand for information? I certainly like to think so.

One of the main things I truly believe is going to help freemasonry carry on into the future is the use of Social Media in order to promote, report on and indeed, enlighten the world on freemasonry in general.

The United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) are especially hot on this topic, with a official twitter account (@UGLE_GrandLodge) which is followed by over five thousand freemasons and steadily increasing every day.

But it’s not just an account that provides a live-tweet commentary of every quarterly communication, (it does do that as well…) but what makes it good is that it re-tweets local freemasons and provincial grand lodges who report on all of their amazing charity work and personal achievements inside the craft. this makes for a MUCH improved masonic twitter experience. it is a personal opinion that masons need to see whats going on not just in their own lodges or provinces, but need to be aware of the entire bigger picture of what freemasons around the country and indeed the world are doing and experiencing. not only is this beneficial for the craft’s brethren but also to the outside world. we NEED to show the world the good work our lodges and individual masons do. This is a free and amazing way to advertise freemasonry.

Another great idea that I’m seeing is the use of twitter accounts being set up for individual lodges. not only does this give your lodge an online presence, it gives your lodge a voice. and a way for your grand lodges and provincial grand lodges to see what you’re doing outside of meetings, but above all. it is a perfect way to advertise your lodge to non-masons.

the most successful of these being the North Harrow lodge no. 6557 (@HarrowFreemason) who boasts a huge influx of candidates who have made enquiries of membership straight through the website.

However, Twitter isn’t the only way that Freemasonry is getting a helping hand.

Recently, The metropolitan Grand Lodge of London have made their Facebook page completely open to masons and non-masons a-like. I believe this to be a wonderful idea for visibility as many people approach the page with questions and comments and find them met by a friendly open answer, not quite a devil worshipping sort are we now, eh?

Within London, The Connaught and Kent Clubs continue to push their social media presence with incredibly active closed Facebook groups for brethren to invite other members and friends to meetings, share photos of meetings and talk about any masonic business they want to without fear of criticism.

In this day and age, Freemasonry MUST adapt to social media and embrace it with open arms. even if you’re the only member in your lodge with a smart phone.. even if you don’t have a twitter account yourself for personal use. It makes so much sense to open a lodge account and just update it now and again. utilising these tools will ensure we are engaging the world and even more so the right kind of people in order to make sure future generations can enjoy the same Freemasonry we all love, for years to come.

Follow the 52 Society on Twitter.

Written by: 4 of Hearts

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